Progress

 

Slow progress is still progress. 

 Steel to rebuild our 1970 Airstream frame

Steel to rebuild our 1970 Airstream frame

The steel for the frame for our 1970 Airstream Trade Wind arrived! And Brian has been scouring the Internet for used windows to replace the broken ones. These are huge steps in the process, as the Airstream sat alone and weary for the better part of two years while in our possession. In between its lengthy intervals of idleness, our Airstream journeyed to Alabama from Louisiana, from Alabama to Colorado and back to Alabama. The poor thing just doesn't know what state to call home, much like ourselves. Last fall we bit the bullet and decided to pursue our dream of living part time in Alabama and part time in Colorado. The ultimate goal is to be near both of our families, while staying true to what we believe matters most. We don't really fall prey to the status quo. We tried that route and it just isn't our thing.

 Major rust problem with our 1970 Airstream

Major rust problem with our 1970 Airstream

So, back to the steel and why it matters. This is a necessary component in the rebuilding process, as the original frame was not worth saving. After 45 years of living in the humid and salt air of the Deep South, the original frame and axles are completely shot. The popular word here appears to be "idle." Yes, the Airstream sat idle for many years here and there, but no longer! Building a completely new frame allows us to significantly upgrade on the original design of the 1970 frame and customize it to our needs.

 Taking measurements for the new frame

If your project is not moving along as quickly as anticipated, don't grumble. Celebrate that you are moving forward, even if bit by bit.